The Business of Transmedia | TIFF Industry Conference 2013

SUCH a fun panel with Andy Merkin & Evan Jones!

Published on May 16, 2014

‘Monetization’ is now a dirty word. Transmedia experts will deconstruct the decision-making process behind the successful and the non-successful business models within the transmedia landscape. We will discuss the ‘how’ and ‘why’ behind budgets, wire-models, deliverables, releasing schedules, and operating as platform-agnostic.

Siobhan O Flynn
Co-Founder, Canadian Rep, Transmedia Alliance (MODERATOR)

Dr. Siobhan O’Flynn consults on digital/interactive storytelling, is the co-creator of the online resource site, TMCResourceKit.com, & co-founder of Transmedia 101, a community building & education initiative for Canadian storytellers moving into the digital sphere. She has mentored across Canada, in the Digital Development Lab (CBC/BC Film/New Media BC), Melting Silos (NFB/SFU Praxis), and for the Sheffield Doc/Fest Design to Deliver, & with the Crossover Lab/Sheffield Doc/Fest Convergence Catalyst. She has published numerous articles, given keynotes, workshops and masterclasses around the globe on topics ranging from transmedia and crossmedia development and design and interactive/web documentaries. Siobhan has presented at MIT, StoryWorld SF, the NFB French Program, the CBC, the Screen Edge Forum, Auckland New Zealand, & Transmedia SG, Singapore. Siobhan was a Jury Member for the Sheffield Doc/Fest Innovation Award 2012, twice a Juror for the CMF’s Experimental Fund.

Evan Jones
Founder, Stitch Media

Evan is the founder of Stitch Media, an interactive media production services company which tells stories using new technology and timeless techniques. A two-time Emmy Award winner, Evan’s work combines television, radio, web, mobile, games & the real world and were recognized in the ‘Top 10 New Media Groundbreakers’ by the Bell Fund. Stitch Media projects range from interactive documentary to branded entertainment. Evan has guest lectured on the art & business of interactive story internationally at the Canadian Film Centre, the Australian Film, Television & Radio School and the University of Southern California. International clients include Microsoft, Disney, FOX, Discovery, CBC, Bell & The Movie Network.

Andy Merkin
Head of Special Projects and Transmedia, Mirada Studios

Andy Merkin is the Head of Special Projects and Transmedia at Mirada Studios. Overseeing cross-platform and nontraditional storytelling projects, Andy develops narrative for traditional and digital media and production management for the complete pipeline. Since joining Mirada in 2011, his production credits include the interactive music video, Ro.me; the THINK exhibit and mobile apps for IBM’s Centennial, the departmentofhumanmanagement.org site for The Strain trilogy, andMirrorWorld by Cornelia Funke on iOS. A true believer that interesting storytellers (hopefully) have led interesting lives, Andy’s previous work experience includes development and production for Sony Pictures Television, training teachers and entrepreneurs in the Peace Corps in Bangladesh, performing improv, and educating students in zoo keeping for Busch Gardens.

Ignite Toronto 3: Siobhan O’Flynn – Mobile Fragments

My 5 minute Petcha Kutcha talk! what a crazy ask – 5 minutes, 20 slides, automatic timer – GO!

From 2010:

‘I advise on the design of digital narratives: transmedia, crossmedia, physical installations, interactive films & recently an interactive graphic novel. In 2006/07 I was the narrative design consultant on Late Fragment, a feature film/dvd that premiered at Cannes. I have advised on over interactive 65 digital works, many of which have gone on to win awards in Canada & abroad.

Having joined the Canadian Film Centre’s Media Lab in 2001, I continue to critically engage with the development of emergent forms in digital media and I have mentored in the Digital Development Lab multiple times and in the Melting Silos Program (NFB/SFU Praxis/Agentic) for the Development of Transmedia Content, both in Vancouver. I am currently programming Storytelling X.O, a full day event at FITC Toronto 2010 on digital storytelling today.’

+City Twitter Data Visualization Project Featured on SSHRC Home Page

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My collaborator, Faisal Anwar, & I were delighted to see our +City research/creation data visualization project featured on the SSHRC home page with a very short interview:

Where social media and ‘real life’ intersect, crucial questions emerge

Ontario researcher Siobhan O’Flynn started out with a seemingly straightforward question: how do people use Twitter to navigate large‑scale cultural events like Toronto’s Nuit Blanche? Digging in, however, the University of Toronto lecturer and her team unearthed issues of copyright, ethics and privacy that could have a profound impact on how journalists, academics and governments handle social media data.

“The information individuals make available without questioning the consequences is astonishing,” she observes. “It is available for data mining to marketers for a fee—and now, as we are well aware, to intelligence agencies as well. There are vital questions we need to answer here going forward.”

O’Flynn was originally curious to learn if insights into social media use during live events in specific locations might contribute to better urban planning—specifically, the creation of spaces that foster positive social outcomes.

“We wanted to know whether social media exchanges affect people’s real‑world actions and experiences,” she says, “and how that might inform urban planning and event design.”

The current project the SSHRC post refers to has a fuller description on our pluscity.me website:

In +City’s latest DV work ‘Public/Private – Playing in the Digital Sphere,’ +City’s research and practice investigates the troubled & unstable grey zone of how Twitter content in the digital public realm changes from public to private, depending on the context of use and the question and often, point of access. As a series of ongoing, interrelated projects, our research now asks: what does it mean to make ‘art’ with content pulled from the digital public realm, especially when Twitter users often list personal details (location, occupation, etc) on their pages? & profiles pics are just as likely to be head shots as custom avatars? What is/should be the borderline between the public & private digital spheres? What are the implications of data mining & the commercialization of digital content in the era of big data? What does it mean to resurrect archived content in a public interactive context? And to be able to search with twitter hashtag streams in real time?